Thursday, November 20, 2014

Knitting Long Socks

Here on the cusp of Winter (at least in the US), I'm working on socks that will help keep my feet and legs warm.  I've discovered that when it comes to maximizing warmth, longer is better. I think that if my leg is warm, my foot stays warmer.  I'm able to explore this theory now that I have a small stash of knee socks.  I've written about these, publishing a pattern addendum for knee socks and designing ones that knit up quicker than standard sock weight.
In the past week, I've tested the theory, comparing knee socks to regular-length socks for warmth.  I'm convinced the knee socks keep my feet warmer.  In fact, the 100% alpaca knee socks made my feet so warm I had to take them off. Hot feet on a cold day, that was a novel sensation.  Since this theory has proven true, I'm glad now that my latest sock project turned out to be as long as it did.



I've been working on this sock for months, primarily because I was only knitting it when I was waiting, here and there, this summer. It was complicated for a travel knit, but the complexity meant the time I spent waiting passed quickly. I was really relieved when I got to the cuff, only to find that knitting the cuff took me almost as long as knitting the foot and leg. It's welted, meaning you knit a few rows then double the knitting over to make the welt.  I explain the historical references that inspired these socks in my project notes. (Find these references, the patterns used and yarn details on my project page here.)



There's proof of the authenticity of this sock. It's authentic, old-style argyle (I could type "Argyll" and be truly authentic.), knit flat and seamed. I did knit the toe in the round after seaming. The complexity and the slowness of this project explains why I've not started the second sock of this pair.  Instead, I'm working on socks that knit up much quicker.  Knee socks, of course, in sport-weight yarn.  They're the second pair that I linked above. I hope to publish a short pattern for these long socks soon.  I'm checking the pattern now, and have knit the feet.  The legs will take longer and are just ribbing.  No need to check the writing of "Knit six inches of ribbing."



I am still having problems posting photos in Blogger. To satisfy my need to share, I've joined Instagram.  Find me as Susan Luni or "at" knotingale.  If you are on Instagram, let me know.  It's filled, as is what's left of knitting blogs, with designers and yarn shops looking to sell patterns and yarn. While I enjoy the information on the new products, I'd like to find a few more knitters to follow.  I love to see photos of  knitting projects.